PHYS 1905 -- Proposed Changes

Fri Feb 3 10:28:35 2017

Effective Term: New:  1179 - Fall 2017
Old:  1175 - Summer 2017
Course Title Short: New:  Fr. Seminar: Aurora
Old:  Freshman Seminar
Course Title Long: New:  Freshman Seminar: Aurora - From Myths to Modern Science
Old:  Freshman Seminar
Max-Min Credits
for Course:
New:  2.0 to 2.0 credit(s)
Old:  3.0 to 1.0 credit(s)
Catalog
Description:
New:  The aurora, or northern lights, have long fascinated humans. We now know that aurora occur on many other planets, including Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus. We will examine the myths from both northern and southern hemisphere that were devised to explain this beautiful natural phenomenon. The development of our scientific understanding of the aurora is littered with completely incorrect explanations by prominent scientists. It is only with the new measurements made after the space age that we have finally begun to understand the aurora ? both on the Earth and on other planets. If the space weather cooperates, we will try to observe the aurora.
Old:  Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
Topics Course: New:  No
Old:  Yes
Course typically offered: New:  Periodic Fall & Spring
Old:  Every Fall & Spring
Academic
Progress Units:
New:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
2.0 credit(s)
Old:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
1.0 credit(s)
Financial Aid
Progress Units:
New:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
2.0 credit(s)
Old:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
1.0 credit(s)
Repetition of
Course:
New:   Repetition not allowed.
Old:   Allow up to 2 repetition(s) totalling up to 6.0 credit(s).
Allow multiple enrollments in a single term.
Editor Comments: New:  Prerequisite changed to FRFY to allow new freshmen to register for freshman seminar regardless of number of transfer credits - lc
Professor Cynthia Cattell
School of Physics and Astronomy
Days offered: TBD
Times Offered: TBD
East Bank
Cynthia Cattell is a professor in the
School of Physics and Astronomy. She
first saw the aurora on a climbing
expedition in Alaska, as a college
freshman. Little did she know at that
time that the study of the physics of
the aurora would become the topic
of her doctoral dissertation, and the
research of some of her students.

Old:  Prerequisite changed to FRFY to allow new freshmen to register for freshman seminar regardless of number of transfer credits - lc
Student Learning Outcomes: * Student in the course:

- Can identify, define, and solve problems

New: removed

Old:

Please explain briefly how this outcome will be addressed in the course. Give brief examples of class work related to the outcome.

Physics problem solving course. Text to follow.

How will you assess the students' learning related to this outcome? Give brief examples of how class work related to the outcome will be evaluated.

Written report. Text to follow.


- Can communicate effectively

New:

Please explain briefly how this outcome will be addressed in the course. Give brief examples of class work related to the outcome.

This is a largely discussion-based class. Assignments include a paper and oral presentation which serve to strengthen overall communication skills.

How will you assess the students' learning related to this outcome? Give brief examples of how class work related to the outcome will be evaluated.

Course grades will be based on an in-‐class presentation, a paper, and in-‐class participation and discussions

Old: unselected


Provisional
Syllabus:

For new courses and courses in which changes in content and/or description and/or credits are proposed, please provide a syllabus that includes the following information: course goals and description; format; structure of the course (proposed number of instructor contact hours per week, student workload effort per week, etc.); topics to be covered; scope and nature of assigned readings (text, authors, frequency, amount per week); required course assignments; nature of any student projects; and how students will be evaluated.

Please limit text to about 12 pages. Text copied and pasted from other sources will not retain formatting and special characters might not copy properly. The University "Syllabi Policy" can be found here

Any syllabus older than two years should be replaced with a current version when making ECAS updates.

New:  University of Minnesota PHYSICS 1905 SYLLABUS
School of Physics and Astronomy Spring, 2016

COURSE INFORMATION
PHYSICS 1905, Aurora from myths to modern science, 2 credits, 2 hours of lecture per week

Course Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Cynthia Cattell
Office: 385 Amundsen
Contact information: 612-626-8918 cattell@umn.edu
Office Hours: By appointment.

Lecture: 13:25 Tuesday
Room: PAN 120
REQUIRED MATERIALS

A list of required and supplementary reading will be provided at the first class and on the course

website. The only required background is an interest in learning about both the science and folklore of
the aurora.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The aurora, or northern lights, have long fascinated humans. We now know that aurora occur on many
other planets, including Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus. We will examine the myths from both northern
and southern hemisphere that were devised to explain this beautiful natural phenomenon. The
development of our scientific understanding of the aurora is littered with completely incorrect
explanations by prominent scientists. It is only with the new measurements made after the space age
that we have finally begun to understand the aurora both on the Earth and on other planets. If the
space weather cooperates, we will try to observe the aurora.
Detailed topics to be covered will depend, in part, on the interests and backgrounds of the enrolled
students.

Tentative topics: (1) Observing the aurora. What do scientists ask? (2 ) Mythology; (3) What did
famous scientists think? Were they correct? (4) How are modern auroral observations made? (5) What is
space weather? (6) What causes the aurora? (7) Basic physics of the aurora; (8) Aurora on other planets;
and (9) Aurora elsewhere in the universe

GRADING

Grades will be based on an in-class presentation, a paper, and in-class participation and discussions.

DEPARTMENTAL POLICIES

ATHLETES must provide their official University of Minnesota athletic letter containing the
approved competition schedule to their instructor and the staff in the Physics undergraduate office,
WILLIAMSON 145.

DISABILITY SERVICES: If you have accommodations for this course, please provide the staff in
WILLIAMSON 145with a copy of your accommodation letter for the current semester.

MANDATORY UNIVERSITY POLICY INFORMATION

Student Conduct Code

The University seeks an environment that promotes academic achievement and integrity, that is
protective of free inquiry, and that serves the educational mission of the University. Similarly, the
University seeks a community that is free from violence, threats, and intimidation; that is respectful of
the rights, opportunities, and welfare of students, faculty, staff, and guests of the University; and that
does not threaten the physical or mental health or safety of members of the University community.
As a student at the University you are expected adhere to Board of Regents Policy: Student

Conduct Code. To review the Student Conduct Code, please see:

http://regents.umn.edu/sites/default/files/policies/Student_Conduct_Code.pdf.

Note that the conduct code specifically addresses disruptive classroom conduct, which means
"engaging in behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor's ability to
teach or student learning. The classroom extends to any setting where a student is engaged in
work toward academic credit or satisfaction of program-based requirements or related activities."

Scholastic Dishonesty

You are expected to do your own academic work and cite sources as necessary. Failing to do so
is scholastic dishonesty. Scholastic dishonesty means plagiarizing; cheating on assignments or
examinations; engaging in unauthorized collaboration on academic work; taking, acquiring, or
using test materials without faculty permission; submitting false or incomplete records of
academic achievement; acting alone or in cooperation with another to falsify records or to obtain
dishonestly grades, honors, awards, or professional endorsement; altering, forging, or misusing a
University academic record; or fabricating or falsifying data, research procedures, or data
analysis. (Student Conduct Code:
http://regents.umn.edu/sites/default/files/policies/Student_Conduct_Code.pdf) If it is determined
that a student has cheated, he or she may be given an "F" or an "N" for the course, and may face
additional sanctions from the University. For additional information, please see:
http://policy.umn.edu/Policies/Education/Education/INSTRUCTORRESP.html.
The Office for Student Conduct and Academic Integrity has compiled a useful list of Frequently
Asked Questions pertaining to scholastic dishonesty:
http://www1.umn.edu/oscai/integrity/student/index.html. If you have additional questions, please
clarify with your instructor for the course. Your instructor can respond to your specific questions
regarding what would constitute scholastic dishonesty in the context of a particular class-e.g.,
whether collaboration on assignments is permitted, requirements and methods for citing sources,
if electronic aids are permitted or prohibited during an exam.

Disability Accommodations

The University of Minnesota is committed to providing equitable access to learning opportunities
for all students. Disability Services (DS) is the campus office that collaborates with students who
have disabilities to provide and/or arrange reasonable accommodations.
If you have, or think you may have, a disability (e.g., mental health, attentional, learning, chronic
health, sensory, or physical), please contact DS at 612-626-1333 to arrange a confidential
discussion regarding equitable access and reasonable accommodations.
If you are registered with DS and have a current letter requesting reasonable accommodations,
please contact your instructor as early in the semester as possible to discuss how the
accommodations will be applied in the course.
For more information, please see the DS website, https://diversity.umn.edu/disability/.

Use of Personal Electronic Devices in the Classroom

Using personal electronic devices in the classroom setting can hinder instruction and learning, not only
for the student using the device but also for other students in the class. To this end, the University
establishes the right of each faculty member to determine if and how personal electronic devices are
allowed to be used in the classroom. For complete information, please reference:
http://policy.umn.edu/Policies/Education/Education/STUDENTRESP.html.

Makeup Work for Legitimate Absences

Students will not be penalized for absence during the semester due to unavoidable or legitimate
circumstances. Such circumstances include verified illness, participation in intercollegiate athletic
events, subpoenas, jury duty, military service, bereavement, and religious observances. Such
circumstances do not include voting in local, state, or national elections. For complete information,
please see: http://policy.umn.edu/Policies/Education/Education/MAKEUPWORK.html.

Appropriate Student Use of Class Notes and Course Materials

Taking notes is a means of recording information but more importantly of personally absorbing and
integrating the educational experience. However, broadly disseminating class notes beyond the
classroom community or accepting compensation for taking and distributing classroom notes
undermines instructor interests in their intellectual work product while not substantially furthering
instructor and student interests in effective learning. Such actions violate shared norms and standards of
the academic community. For additional information, please see:
http://policy.umn.edu/Policies/Education/Education/STUDENTRESP.html.

Sexual Harassment

"Sexual harassment" means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and/or other verbal
or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably
interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or
offensive working or academic environment in any University activity or program. Such behavior is not
acceptable in the University setting. For additional information, please consult Board of Regents Policy:
http://regents.umn.edu/sites/default/files/policies/SexHarassment.pdf

Equity, Diversity, Equal Opportunity, and Affirmative Action

The University provides equal access to and opportunity in its programs and facilities, without regard to
race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, age, marital status, disability, public assistance
status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. For more information,
please consult Board of Regents Policy:
http://regents.umn.edu/sites/default/files/policies/Equity_Diversity_EO_AA.pdf.

Mental Health and Stress Management

As a student you may experience a range of issues that can cause barriers to learning, such as
strained relationships, increased anxiety, alcohol/drug problems, feeling down, difficulty
concentrating and/or lack of motivation. These mental health concerns or stressful events may lead
to diminished academic performance and may reduce your ability to participate in daily activities.
University of Minnesota services are available to assist you. You can learn more about the broad
range of confidential mental health services available on campus via the Student Mental Health
Website: http://www.mentalhealth.umn.edu.

Old:  Freshman seminars- topics vary by term. See proposals.