BBE 4013 -- Changes

Thu Jan 28 10:49:23 2010

Effective Term: New:  1113 - Spring 2011
Old:  1089 - Fall 2008
Max-Min Credits
for Course:
New:  3.0 to 3.0 credit(s)
Old:  4.0 to 4.0 credit(s)
Component 1: New:  LEC (with final exam)
Old:  LAB (no final exam)
Component 2: New:  
Old:  LEC (with final exam)
Auto-Enroll
Course:
New:  No
Old:  Yes
Graded
Component:
New:  LEC
Old:  LAB
Academic
Progress Units:
New:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
3.0 credit(s)
Old:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
4.0 credit(s)
Financial Aid
Progress Units:
New:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
3.0 credit(s)
Old:  Not allowed to bypass limits.
4.0 credit(s)
Repetition of
Course:
New:   Repetition not allowed.
Old:   Repetition not allowed.
Editor Comments: New:  Change to 3 credits from 4 credits.  The lap component is being dropped from the course.
Old:  <no text provided>
Proposal Changes: New:  Change to 3 credits from 4 credits.  The lap component is being dropped from the course.
Old:  <no text provided>
Student Learning Outcomes: * Student in the course:

- Can identify, define, and solve problems

New:

Please explain briefly how this outcome will be addressed in the course. Give brief examples of class work related to the outcome.

1. Derive constitutive relationships for fluid flow, energy and mass transport in biological systems 2. Formulate the governing conservation equations for energy and mass transport in biological systems 3. Formulate equilibrium and non-equilibrium relationships for energy and mass transport in biological systems 4. Recognize analytical solutions to well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 5. Understand the fundamentals and application of discrete methods for solving well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 6. Solve practical problems involving energy and mass transport in biological systems 7. Develop computer applications using Visual Basic.

How will you assess the students' learning related to this outcome? Give brief examples of how class work related to the outcome will be evaluated.

GRADING: Three Hour Exams 30% each, Homework 35%, Project 35%

Old: unselected


- Can locate and critically evaluate information

New:

Please explain briefly how this outcome will be addressed in the course. Give brief examples of class work related to the outcome.

1. Derive constitutive relationships for fluid flow, energy and mass transport in biological systems 2. Formulate the governing conservation equations for energy and mass transport in biological systems 3. Formulate equilibrium and non-equilibrium relationships for energy and mass transport in biological systems 4. Recognize analytical solutions to well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 5. Understand the fundamentals and application of discrete methods for solving well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 6. Solve practical problems involving energy and mass transport in biological systems 7. Develop computer applications using Visual Basic.

How will you assess the students' learning related to this outcome? Give brief examples of how class work related to the outcome will be evaluated.

GRADING: Three Hour Exams 30% each, Homework 35%, Project 35%

Old: unselected


- Have mastered a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry

New:

Please explain briefly how this outcome will be addressed in the course. Give brief examples of class work related to the outcome.

1. Derive constitutive relationships for fluid flow, energy and mass transport in biological systems 2. Formulate the governing conservation equations for energy and mass transport in biological systems 3. Formulate equilibrium and non-equilibrium relationships for energy and mass transport in biological systems 4. Recognize analytical solutions to well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 5. Understand the fundamentals and application of discrete methods for solving well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 6. Solve practical problems involving energy and mass transport in biological systems 7. Develop computer applications using Visual Basic.

How will you assess the students' learning related to this outcome? Give brief examples of how class work related to the outcome will be evaluated.

GRADING: Three Hour Exams 30% each, Homework 35%, Project 35%

Old: unselected


- Can communicate effectively

New:

Please explain briefly how this outcome will be addressed in the course. Give brief examples of class work related to the outcome.

1. Derive constitutive relationships for fluid flow, energy and mass transport in biological systems 2. Formulate the governing conservation equations for energy and mass transport in biological systems 3. Formulate equilibrium and non-equilibrium relationships for energy and mass transport in biological systems 4. Recognize analytical solutions to well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 5. Understand the fundamentals and application of discrete methods for solving well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 6. Solve practical problems involving energy and mass transport in biological systems 7. Develop computer applications using Visual Basic.

How will you assess the students' learning related to this outcome? Give brief examples of how class work related to the outcome will be evaluated.

GRADING: Three Hour Exams 30% each, Homework 35%, Project 35%

Old: unselected


- Understand the role of creativity, innovation, discovery, and expression across disciplines

New:

Please explain briefly how this outcome will be addressed in the course. Give brief examples of class work related to the outcome.

1. Derive constitutive relationships for fluid flow, energy and mass transport in biological systems 2. Formulate the governing conservation equations for energy and mass transport in biological systems 3. Formulate equilibrium and non-equilibrium relationships for energy and mass transport in biological systems 4. Recognize analytical solutions to well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 5. Understand the fundamentals and application of discrete methods for solving well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems 6. Solve practical problems involving energy and mass transport in biological systems 7. Develop computer applications using Visual Basic.

How will you assess the students' learning related to this outcome? Give brief examples of how class work related to the outcome will be evaluated.

GRADING: Three Hour Exams 30% each, Homework 35%, Project 35%

Old: unselected


Provisional
Syllabus:
Please provide a provisional syllabus for new courses and courses in which changes in content and/or description and/or credits are proposed that include the following information: course goals and description; format/structure of the course (proposed number of instructor contact hours per week, student workload effort per week, etc.); topics to be covered; scope and nature of assigned readings (texts, authors, frequency, amount per week); required course assignments; nature of any student projects; and how students will be evaluated.

The University policy on credits is found under Section 4A of "Standards for Semester Conversion" at http://www.fpd.finop.umn.edu/groups/senate/documents/policy/semestercon.html . Provisional course syllabus information will be retained in this system until new syllabus information is entered with the next major course modification, This provisional course syllabus information may not correspond to the course as offered in a particular semester.

New:  BBE 4013          Transport in Biological Systems

NOTE: All references in this document to Visual Basic programming are dropped starting in Fall, 2010 as the course will convert to 3 credit and will not have a lab. The programming/calculations part of the present course will be moved to the proposed revised Introduction to Design course.
(3 cr;  prereq [3013 or Concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in BBE 3013 or ChEn 3701], CE 3502, [ME 3331 or ChEn 4101], upper div IT); A-F only; 3 lect per week,).
Course Description: Application of thermodynamics, fluid flow, heat/mass transfer to design problems involving biological processes and materials at cell, organism, and system level. Agricultural, environmental, food, and bioprocessing applications. There are also some applications related to the biomedical field as well. Computer applications with Visual Basic programming.

Instructors: Professor Mrinal Bhattacharya, Room 212, BAE Bldg, 5-5234, bhatt002@umn.edu
    Professor John L. Nieber, Room 203, BAE Bldg, 5-6724, Nieber@umn.edu
    Mr. Michael Talbot, Room 307, BAE Bldg, 5-3782, talbo024@umn.edu

Class Times:  Lecture        12:50-1:40 PM MWF.   BAE 106
            
Students completing this course should be able to:
1. Derive constitutive relationships for fluid flow, energy and mass transport in biological systems
2. Formulate the governing conservation equations for energy and mass transport in biological systems
3. Formulate equilibrium and non-equilibrium relationships for energy and mass transport in biological systems
4. Recognize analytical solutions to well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems
5. Understand the fundamentals and application of discrete methods for solving well-posed mathematical formulations related to energy and mass transport in biological systems
6. Solve practical problems involving energy and mass transport in biological systems
7. Develop computer applications using Visual Basic.


Text: Biological and Bioenvironmental Heat and Mass Transfer by Ashim K. Datta. Marcel Dekker AG. (2002).
       
References:  Biological Process Engineering, An analogical approach to fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer applied to biological systems by A.T. Johnson, John Wiley and Sons, (1999).

Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems by GA Truskey, F. Yan and DF Katz. Second Ed. Pearson Prentice Hall, (2008).

Basic Transport Phenomena in Biomedical Engineering by Ronald L Fournier. Second Ed. Taylor and Francis (2007).

Homework assignments:
1.        All work done in pencil with legible writing/graphics.
2.        Clearly defined problem statement.
3.        Clearly defined solution steps and solution results.
       
GRADING:        Three Hour Exams 30% each, Homework 35%, Project 35%
The final exam is optional. You may choose to retake either one of the three exams for your final. In the event you choose to retake the exam, your earlier grade for the exam you have decided to substitute will be replaced by your final grade.


Old:  <no text provided>